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Lyttelton, portal to Canterbury’s historic past, a vibrant sustainable community creating a living future

LIFT Library

lift-librayOver five hundred books on the transition movement, alternative currencies, sustainability and community development, economics, food, health, and relevant DVDs and magazines.

  • Join the library for life for only $20 and borrow anything you are interested in.
  • Come to the library (after phoning Juliet) and browse the bookshelves over a cuppa.
  • Members will be kept updated through regular newsletters.
  • Arrangements can be made to drop off and collect books at the Information Centre on Oxford Street.
  • Free film evenings - thought provoking, interesting and inspirational - see details below for next film evening.
  • At the Lyttelton Farmers Market each Saturday, a selection of LIFT's books, DVDs and magazines will be on display, for members to borrow.

This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs the Climate

Naomi Klein

This is one of the most important books in LIFT.

It explains everything about what’s wrong with our world (well, almost!). It tells us about everything that is being done and that can be done to change the situation and save our future (well,  almost!).  If Naomi Klein had included any more topics the book would have been too heavy!  

 

Don’t let that put you off. It may take a lot of time to read; maybe you’ll even skip some  pages (I couldn’t!) But it will enlighten you with its detail, thoroughly backed by references, on so  many important topics, revealed in everyday language with clarifying examples.

Not only does she explain how and why things have gone wrong with each aspect (climate  change, fossil fuels’ dominance, free market fundamentalism, big business and greenwashing,  misplaced dreams of technology, greedy exploitation of the planet and its people, to name a few) ;  she also explains for each one the actions that have been taken and are being taken to remedy  them. She doesn’t just leave that till a chapter at the end, as many writers do.

I’ll quote one section from her Introduction. After detailing the huge rise in global emissions  since 2009 (a surge of 5.9% in 2010 – the largest absolute increase since the Industrial Revolution),  she writes: “So my mind keeps coming back to the question: what is wrong with us? What is really preventing us  from putting out the fire that is threatening to burn down our collective house?    “I think the answer is far more simple than many have led us to believe: we have not done the things  that are necessary to lower emissions because those things fundamentally conflict with deregulated  capitalism, the reigning ideology for the entire period we have been struggling to find a way out of  this crisis. We are stuck because the actions that would give us the best chance of averting  catastrophe – and would benefit the vast majority – are extremely threatening to an elite minority  that has a stranglehold over our economy, our political process, and most of our major media  outlets.”

One LIFT member has pointed out that she has not explained the rising tide of alternative  money systems that could reduce the power of those controlling many of the problems.  A good  point.  Maybe that will be her next book?  

And more from her Conclusion:  “..from here on, when we take, we must not only  give  back, but we must also take care.” “Fundamentally, the task is to articulate not just an alternative set of policy proposals but an  alternative worldview to rival the one at the heart of the ecological crisis – embedded in  interdependence rather than hyper-individualism, reciprocity rather than dominance, and  cooperation rather than hierarchy. “It is slowly dawning on a great many of us that no one is going to step in and fix this crisis;  that if  change is going to take place it will only be because leadership bubbled up from below. “We are also significantly less isolated than many of us were even a decade ago: the new structures  built in the rubble of neoliberalism – everything from social media to worker co-ops to farmer’s  markets to neighbourhood sharing banks – have helped us to find community despite the  fragmentation of postmodern life.” This book is inspiring!

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Free Film Evening with Lift Library

Deforestation and Reforestation

As Monday June 5th is Arbor Day, I decided to choose a selection of videos on this subject. As I type, I look across Lyttelton Harbour at hills that have trees only in a few lower areas; large areas that used to be covered in sheep when I was a child, and in trees before humans arrived! are now bare and unused. If this area could be replanted with trees, especially natives, what a difference it would make to soil erosion, retention of CO2 and thus reducing climate problems, and providing beauty to look at, and places to walk to improve our emotional and physical health! Fortunately such efforts are already being made in the harbour, but imagine if more of us took action to grow more trees. Come and get some inspiration on Friday 2nd.
7.15 pm at The Portal, 54A Oxford Street, up the drive between the playground and the swimming pool. Koha appreciated, or Timebank credit to LIFT.

Lifelong membership for $20

The $20 fee is per person/couple/family and entitles you to borrow books, DVDs and magazines for a month at a time. Members who cannot return books personally may post them back, or arrange to leave them at a suitable place, such as the Information Centre in Oxford St. Members who lose or damage books will be asked to pay accordingly.

A full list of books, DVDs and magazines is available from Juliet by email. Members receive regular newsletters with book reviews and the latest news and reviews.

LIFT's Reviews & Summaries

Click for more Book & DVD Reviews

 Wanting to read one of our great books but just don't have time?

Just ask Juliet for a summary, she has several available by email including:
  • "Blessed Unrest", by Paul Hawken
  • "Fleeing Vesuvius", by FEASTA and LE
  • "No More Throwaway People", by Edgar S. Cahn
  • "Sacred Economics", by Charles Eisenstein
  • "The End of Money and the Future of Civilization", by Thomas H. Greco
  • "The Future of Money", by Bernard Lietaer
  • "We the People", by John Buck and Sharon Villines